In your Greyton Garden In September

So, pick flowering plants that are hardy and able to survive on minimal water. Plant gazanias, wild garlic, wild irises, and off course the wide range of bright and beautiful vygies available.

Wildlife-attracting and spring-blooming  shrubs and perennials to try are Felicia’s  pelargoniums, argyranthemums, arum lilies and carnations.

Basil and tomatoes are good companions. The basil keeps the aphids, fruit flies and beetles away from the tomatoes and can even enhance their flavour.

The clivia is king of spring and it is definitely the plant of the month. It is easy to grow, great for shade, uses water sparingly, and if protected from the worst winter cold, will provide glowing flowers, later turning into very ornamental seeds in a warm, rusty-red shade.

Points to Remember about Roses in September

Do not disturb the soil around rose bushes during the growing season. 

Always dispose of cuttings - don’t leave them lying around on the ground. Especially cuttings  “infected” with black spot or fungus

Occasionally inspect the ties of your standard rose trees and loosen them if necessary.

Remove all old rose flowers continually throughout the year. (dead heading)

Always dig square holes. This encourages outward growing roots

Never re-plant a new rose in the same soil as an old one. (or any plant for that matter)

Read and comply with the instructions for sprays, feeds, etc. An overly strong mix can cause damage and a weak mix will not work. Discard sprays that have past expiry date

Feed each rose with 3:1:5 plant food or similar and water well. Keep a look out for aphids (greenfly / blackfly) and rust (bright orange fungus on the underside of leaves). Use Kombat Aphids and Kombat Rust respectively but do not apply together.

Spray with Rose Protector and Chronos to address insects and insecticides

Towards the end of September apply a good layer of  compost over the entire bed and good mulch such as bark nuggets around the base of each plant.  Begin deep watering – twice a week at first and then according to weather conditions.